Part 4: Kenzie Cooke And One Last Real Question

Its not every day an 18 yr old takes questions about life from someone who is 29. But this piece did that, and age only suggests one thing in this interview. We all have a desitny, we all choose the path, you can be 18, you can be 29, hell you can be 89. What you do today, will transition into what you do tomorrow. We all have to choose based on the relative nature of our own individual lives.

Here we are, its day four with the talented Ms. Cooke. This week we have learned a great deal about life, and how people perceive the possibilities of their own personal destinations. Tomorrow will be a fun closing, where I ask some simple questions, and she gives good answers. Today will be one question, closing this particular conversation, for now. It has been a pleasure reliving some of my own thoughts from the old days. Its not every day an 18 yr old takes questions about life from someone who is 29. But this piece did that, and age only suggests one thing in this interview. We all have a desitny, we all choose the path, you can be 18, you can be 29, hell you can be 89. What you do today, will transition into what you do tomorrow. We all have to choose based on the relative nature of our own individual lives. I choose to write this piece, Kenzie chooses to suggest to the world a different pace, and a recognition that getting older doesn’t mean you have to stop living. I admire this young artist for using her abilities for something as serious and palpable as life, and its seemingly popular course of giving up the dream – we all have dreams, here’s to living them.

Twilight Frequencies: I think we all notice how much our society has evolved. Sunder does a really good job translating the ecology within that evolution. Most notably how much more freedom we all have as our younger selves, and how the atmosphere within our individual cycles dictates the reality. Why do you think life becomes that way? Why is growing up represented in Sunder by the unfortunate office space, as opposed to the freedom of running through a field, or exploring the curiosities of adolescents?

Kenzie Cooke: I wouldn’t really know what exactly could steer a life in that direction, maybe just at a certain point feeling a sense of responsibility or obligation, maybe with new knowledge or realizations on different levels of consciousness.  I wouldn’t even say that  ‘growing up’ is the source of this kind of separation, something deeper rooted than that.

To Be Continued….

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