Atlas Sound, Logos

This Gust of Wind wakes you when the dogs howl rides over the empty streets. You lift up suddenly from dreaming of something you vividly recall, but can’t decisively remember.

Gust of Wind # 13

Atlas Sound, Logos

Kranky

This Gust of Wind wakes you when the dogs howl rides over the empty streets. You lift up suddenly from dreaming of something you vividly recall, but can’t decisively remember.

Bradford Cox has become a name in the last few years that packs several meanings. Not only is he a part of the exceptionally regarded group called Deer Hunter; he also managed to find time to invent a fresh side-project in Atlas Sound. Both have become regulars on many different lists of praise. This album is just another addition to an already impressive body of work that deserves a thorough listen – Sign me up!

Logos has many personalities throughout. From track to track, there is a plethora of emotions, which seem recorded over a time frame consisting of excessive highs and lows. It’s a connection album with Cox waiving a mirror to see his own reflections in different forms of light. In this case the light is the special guests that contribute to the record. There is a small touch of melancholy in all of this, but certainly enough joy to compound the darkness into something more than a lonely impression.

“Walkabout,” featuring Panda Bear of the group Animal Collectiveis one of the brightest spots on the Album. It’s a catchy sample with harmonies leaving a memorable touch. The track “Quick Canal,” featuring Laetitia Sadier of Stereo Lab, is the part of the record where you take off in your own head. Her voice soars well over Atlas Sound’s atmospheric steadiness, and this collaboration is worth exploring in the future. Another track that really sounds amazing is called “Shelia” Cox sings, “When we die we’ll burry ourselves, because no one wants to die alone,” and as the track fades he belts “Die alone together.” Something we all have pondered momentarily throughout our daily lives.

The original flare, and chameleon sensibility on Logos, gives it enough playing power to stick around as a nice addition to any collection.

– Ryan Boos

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